The Effects of Smoking and Postoperative Complications After Total Hip Replacement

The Effects of Smoking and Postoperative Complications After Total Hip Replacement

Dr. Sahota, MD and colleagues at the 25th anniversary meeting of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons presented a poster on their findings with regard to smoking and the incidence of complications. They used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. They reviewed 60,353 patients and included 12,588 from that who had appropriate inclusion criteria. Of that group, there were 1501 smokers. After adjusting for differences, they found that smoking was associated with higher rates of overall surgical complications, surgical site infection, and readmission following surgery for hip replacement. They noted that smoking is the modifiable condition that adversely affects outcomes after hip replacement and smoking cessation should be attempted prior to elective joint replacement surgery.

About The Author

William Barrett, MD is a fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon who specializes in primary and revision hip and knee replacement. He performs over 500 hip and knee replacement procedures each year. He is actively involved in clinical research on Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement (THA), Alternative Bearings for THA, Less Invasive Approaches to joint replacement and use of computerized vs. custom cutting guides for knee replacement. As a nationally recognized joint replacement surgeon, he lectures globally on hip and knee replacement topics. He is active in the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Continuing Medical Education programs. He is a board examiner for the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery.