Severity of Arthritis Predicts Outcomes in Young Patients with Total Hip Replacement

Severity of Arthritis Predicts Outcomes in Young Patients with Total Hip Replacement

A poster presented at the 25th anniversary meeting of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons in Dallas, Texas November 5th through 8th from the University of Iowa reviewed the outcome of 146 hip replacements in patients less than 55 years of age. They noted an inverse relationship between the preop x-ray and amount of joint space loss, and improvements in function, pain and quality of life. They concluded that patients with less severe radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis had less predictable improvements in terms of function, pain relief and activity. They concluded that young patients who had greater than 1.5 mm of joint space remaining on plain radiographs, had suboptimal outcomes from total hip replacement. This reinforces one of our commonly held beliefs that the severity of arthritis preoperatively predicts the reliability of the outcome after surgery. That is the reason we try and maximize patient’s native hip using therapy, weight reduction and anti-inflammatories prior to proceeding with joint replacement surgery.

About The Author

William Barrett, MD is a fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon who specializes in primary and revision hip and knee replacement. He performs over 500 hip and knee replacement procedures each year. He is actively involved in clinical research on Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement (THA), Alternative Bearings for THA, Less Invasive Approaches to joint replacement and use of computerized vs. custom cutting guides for knee replacement. As a nationally recognized joint replacement surgeon, he lectures globally on hip and knee replacement topics. He is active in the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Continuing Medical Education programs. He is a board examiner for the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery.